House lover makes his favorite in Roswell, with past, present and future elements

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Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

As the founder of Coastal life magazine and the mastermind behind the top 20 HGTV Dream Homes, Jack Thomasson has helped shape the likes and desires of homeowners for decades. For his own home in Roswell, he made it personal. “Of all the dream homes I’ve built, this is the one I’m most proud of,” says Jack.

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
After walking past the original farm several times, Christian finally met the three sisters who had grown up there and still owned the property, and explained to them his and Jack’s vision of saving the house. “Jack and I literally sketched a plan on a napkin at dinner one night,” he said. Their design was a renovation that incorporated the existing porch and other elements to preserve its rural charm. Now other people often stop to admire the house.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
Mediterranean seashell stone, with fossils embedded in the tiles, borders the pool.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

The starting point for it all was a 1950s cottage – just 700 square feet – that stood on bucolic farmland near Roswell’s bustling Canton Street corridor. “I looked at the architectural style of the chalet and took off,” says Jack, who applied his skills as a residential planner to incorporate the original house in an enlarged version. He and his partner, Christian Strong, have their primary residence in Florida, but they live here when they spend time with Jack’s daughters, Dustin and Sidney.

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
Cantoni’s cowhide chairs purchased for a previous house fit into the relaxed feel of the foyer, with its ceiling intentionally lower, as they are part of the original structure. The lamps are from Arteriors.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
With their roots in Florida, the owners have made connecting with the outdoors a priority.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
“If you want to have a vaulted ceiling, there has to be some gain when you look up,” says Jack, who has covered the living room ceiling in stained white oak. The horse painting, Approaching Beauty, is by Roswell artist Patrick Taylor.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

The understated front porch, foyer, and a girl’s bedroom all come from the original chalet, but Jack then added a larger U-shaped structure with farmhouse elements. “No Lost Parts” became a mantra during the design process. The end result is a one story home surrounded by views and access to the outdoors.

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
Special kitchen features include a custom iron and glass display wall that surrounds the wall ovens. A series of paintings by famed Atlanta wine artist Thomas Arvid depict hands holding wine glasses. The vertical layout and the subject fit perfectly into the kitchen, notes Jack.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
The patina of the recovered worm-eaten chestnut floors is part of the charm of the dining room. Jack designed the iron and wood table himself. The chairs are from the Alpharetta Porch on the South Main. The abstract paintings are by the artist of Santa Fe Rose Masterpol.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
The spacious owners bathroom includes a custom metal mirror with a grid pattern, made by Braselton craftsman Joe Mastrogiovanni.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

Vaulted ceilings are a signature element, from 26-foot-high versions in the great room and kitchen, edged in stained white oak, to equally interesting versions in the girls’ bedrooms, the owners bedroom, the bathroom. of the owners, the kitchen and the guests. bedroom. The floors are worm-eaten chestnut salvaged from a North Carolina barn, adding to the rustic character. Jack also had his mason lay the bricks vertically, with heavier mortar in places, a look inspired by a historic barn he saw in Macon. “There is definitely a masculine vibe,” Jack admits.

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
Entertainment thrives in this home, with outdoor spaces like this dining room. There is also a pétanque court and a fire pit with benches nestled in a brick archway.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

A house lover creates his favorite, with past, present and future elements
The sliding doors, made from a Brazilian teak screen that belonged to Christian in another house, are the focal point of the owners bedroom. One of their favorites is the painting by artist Stefano Sanna, titled Torso.

Photograph by Lauren Rubinstein

Although Jack comes from an industry with a keen eye on trends, this house largely ignores ever-changing opinions. A distance from large rooms? He disagrees, noting that the great room / dining / kitchen is the main gathering place in the house – no extra rooms, offices or basements here. The idea that open shelves have no place in a kitchen? He and Christian, the cook of the house, use theirs daily.

It won’t be his last house project, but Jack hints he might be here for a while. He admits, “I haven’t done anything here with the idea of ​​reselling.”

[Editor’s note: After this story went to press, Thomasson put the home on the market, listing it for $2.4 million.]

RESOURCES | Residential planner Jack Thomasson, Home Office Landscaping Gibbs Landscape, gibbslandscape.com Outside Painting: “Cotton Balls” by Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Lanterns: Gas lanterns by Sheryl, gaslanternsandlights.com. Foyer Presidents: Cantoni, cantoni.com. Lamps: Artteriors, artteriorshome.com. Big room Light fixtures (also in the dining room and the kitchen): Artteriors. Upholstered sofa and armchairs: RH, rh.com. Side chairs: The porch on South Main, theporchonsouthmain.com. Horse painting: Patrick Taylor Fine Art, patricktaylorfineart.com. Dining room Chairs: The porch on South Main. Paints: Masterpol, masterpol.com. Food All appliances: Sub-Zero, Wolf and Cove, subzero-wolf.com. Bar stools: RH. Owner’s room Painting: SaSa Art, sasa-art.com. Lamps: Scott Antiques Markets, scottantiquemarket.com. owners’ bath Lights: Lumens, lumens.com. Custom mirror: Joe Mastro Custom Iron, 678-600-4580. Pool area Furniture: RH.

This article appears in our Fall 2021 issue of The home of Atlanta magazine.


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